Book is now available


My new book, is Parenting Beyond Pink and Blue: How to Raise Your Kids Free of Gender Stereotypes, is now available pretty much everywhere (even the Kindle version). I have been pleased with the reviews it has gotten so far.  If you read it, I would love to hear your thoughts. On Thursday, April 24, I will be discussing the book on Good Day Chicago at 9:45am.

 

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Publisher’s Weekly

Brown, associate professor of developmental psychology at the University of Kentucky and a Psychology Today blogger, has researched the impact of gender stereotypes on children and teens. Here, she presents her argument to parents, asserting that the differences between boys and girls are far less pronounced than the media and some other authors contend (most notably, Michael Gurian, whose Gurian Institute trains educators to approach the learning styles of boys and girls quite differently). Wading through and interpreting the gender studies, Brown concludes that the way boys and girls learn, play, verbalize, and think is far more similar than dissimilar, though some differences do exist; for instance, boys are more physically aggressive and their brains develop at a slightly slower pace
than girls’. The mother of two girls, Brown urges parents to beware of studies that are flawed and overstated, and to place greater focus on the individual child. As Brown also explores her own feelings as a mother, she is not without humor, sharing for instance, a boy/girl pizza birthday party ambushed by the pizza maker’s unsolicited gender-based comments (“Boys always like pepperoni”). Though her anecdotes and observations can be amusing, Brown’s message is simultaneously a somber and far-reaching commentary on the ways that gender stereotyping needlessly limits and labels children. Agent: Linda Konner, Linda Konner Literary Agency. (Apr.)

 

Library Journal Review

Brown (developmental psychology, Univ. of Kentucky; Psychology Today, blogger at Beyond Pink and Blue), a leading specialist on the impact of gender stereotypes, offers a review of the latest research combined with a guide to raising children free of the negative influence of gender expectations and limitations. She argues that children are “free to flourish” when gender is deemphasized and covers both the neuroscience and cultural influences of sex in language that is accessible and at times even humorous. Beyond the issues of “pink and blue,” her assertions have a scientific rather than feminist flavor and will enlighten those even of the “boys will be boys” school. ­VERDICT Much quality literature has been published over the last few years on gender studies, and this title juxtaposes other works such as Leonard Sax’s Why Gender Matters: What Parents and Teachers Need To Know About the Emerging Science of Sex Differences. For all libraries serving parents.

 

Getting to the Bottom of the Princess Obsession

As someone who studies gender stereotypes in children, and as someone who has an intense dislike for the princess movement, it has been a little frustrating that my youngest daughter always talks about wanting to be a princess. Her exposure is pretty limited, at least compared to other American preschool girls. I don’t allow Disney Princess movies, although she has seen them at other people’s houses. She has seen the occasional Sophia The First (which I don’t love, but I don’t hate), but spends a lot more time with Jake and the Neverland Pirates and Mickey Mouse.  Regardless, she has developed a deep love for princesses.

Recently, I tried to get to the bottom of it. I asked her “Why?” she loved princesses. Her answer “Their sparkly clothes.” This rationale was reinforced when she told her older sister that the princess from Brave wasn’t a real princess because “her clothes were too dark.” Of course, the one princess I like, she rejects for being goth.

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Then I had to face facts. I may not like princesses because they are helpless, do nothing for themselves, and only wait for a boy to show up and save them, but she likes them because they are sparkly. Perhaps we could reach a compromise. I am not a sparkly girl, but there is nothing wrong with liking sparkle. That isn’t my battle. I tried to think about (a) a female, (b) who wears sparkle, and (c) is powerful. My own childhood came back to me. WONDER WOMAN! As a kid, I wore Wonder Woman Underoos ALL THE TIME (If you are too young for that, I am sorry you missed out on the fun). I watched her cartoons, I watched the TV show. She has sparkle bracelets, and even a tiara. And she can kick ass.

I began to google images of Wonder Woman and show them to Grace. Lo and behold, she was hooked. Now I am showing her old episodes from SuperFriends. She loves Wonder Woman and her lasso and invisible jet. My next stop is to order her a WW costume to dress up for pretend play.

It may not be the perfect female role model. Marie Curie would be way cooler. But I am happy that she has found a sparkly girl to root for, one that actually does something worth rooting for.